ASKXXI: Ecologies of Interdisciplinary Research and Practice in Art + Science and Technology

Genevieve G. Tremblay, Jeff Brice, Fernanda Dunlop, Nelida Pohl, and Belen Gallardo



ASKXXI: Arts + Science Knowledge Building and Sharing in the XXI (21st) Century was a US-Chile pilot program fostering inquiry and inter-hemispheric collaboration in art, emerging technologies, and the ecological sciences. Funded through a US Embassy public diplomacy grant, ASKXXI was an adaptive curriculum model situated on a collaborative platform of academic partners. This model provided freedom, flexibility, and responsiveness to dynamic learning and professional development opportunities. The year-long pilot was customized to a jury-selected cohort of Chilean professionals working at the intersection of art and science. Experiential, site-based workshops in arts, ecology, embryology, biomechanics, technology research, and science communication provided exposure to frontier research scientists, data visualization and immersive technology innovators, as well as contemporary artists focused on ecology. Despite the inherent challenges in launching such an independent and distributed program, ASKXXI expanded professional capacities and opportunities. Most importantly, the program activated a thriving ecosystem of practitioners working on pressing issues of sustainability, biodiversity loss, and climate change in both regions. An “ecology of practices” is the framework of our transdisciplinary pilot that tested the feasibility of interhemispheric knowledge exchange, interdisciplinary and institutional collaboration, and impact-focused cultural and scientific diplomacy.

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ASKXXI: Ecologies of Interdisciplinary Research and Practice in Art + Science and Technology © 2022 by Genevieve G. Tremblay, Jeff Brice, Fernanda Dunlop, Nelida Pohl, and Belen Gallardo is licensed under CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0

Published:

August 4, 2022

DOI

https://doi.org/10.48807/2022.0.0068

Completed

Between June 2017 and March 2019

Sites and Institutions

US Embassy, Santiago (Public Affairs), Department of State
Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad, IEB Chile
CIBAS: Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Ambientes Sustentables, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción
UCSC Cultural, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción (CIBAS)
Bi-Lab (Interactive Biology Lab), Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción
Melimoyu Nature Reserve , Fundación Meri
Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington
UW Bothell School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, University of Washington
Design Department, Cornish College of the Arts
Fine Art Department, Reed College
Slater Museum, University of Puget Sound
2D and 3D Visualization Research , Microsoft Research
UW Data Lab, University of Washington
Building 4 - Fearless 320 VR Studio, Pacific Science Center
The Spheres, Amazon Greenhouse, Amazon
Nautilus Live Exploration Program (EV Nautilus), Ocean Exploration Trust
Science Education Outreach (SciEd), Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center
Sara Simonds Green Conservatory, University of Washington, Bothell
Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound
Burke Museum of Natural History, University of Washington
Jacob Lawrence Gallery, University of Washington
Hiram M. Chittenden-Ballard Locks
Schema Design Studio
Vermillion Gallery, Seattle
Sliprabbit Studio, Seattle
Ginny Ruffner Studios, Seattle
Ian Boyden Studio, Seattle
George Rodriguez Studio, Seattle

Keywords

Art + Science Arts Integrated Research Art + Tech Biology Bridging Networks Ecology Environment Eco Art Field Based Interhemispheric Collaboration Pedagogy Placemaking Visualization Transdisciplinary Ecologies Of Practice Frontier Ecologies Social Networks Ocean Science Public Diplomacy Science Diplomacy Virtual Collaboration

Disciplines

Art Art + Tech Augmented Reality Cultural Practice Cultural Diplomacy Digital Media Ecology Environmental Art Data Visualization Experience Design Marine Ocean Science Scientific Illustration Science Communication 3 D Printing Pedagogy Public Art Public Diplomacy Virtual Reality





Figure 1. Members of the ASKXXI US Cohort in Friday Harbor, Washington, 2018. Fredy Diaz, Jack DeLap, Geraldine Ondrizek, Beatriz Buttazzoni, Genevieve Tremblay, Jeff Brice, Thomas Kramer, Jose de la Parra, Javiera Constanzo, Cecilia Toro, Pablo Savaria, Miguel Bolt, Bruno Pohl, Marcelo Velasco, Kylie Rench, Fernando Mejias, Nicole García, Belén Gallardo, Marianela Camaño, Fernanda Oyarzún, Nélida Pohl.
Candid outdoor photo of a group of 21 people sitting together on a rocky shoreline looking toward the camera and smiling.
Arts + Science Knowledge Building and Sharing in the XXI Century (21st century), referred to as ASKXXI, was a US-Chile pilot program fostering research-based inquiry and inter-hemispheric collaboration in art, emerging technologies, and the ecological sciences. What started out as an experimental international exchange and professional development program pilot became the first Art and Ecological Science Certificate Diploma Program in Chile: The Construction of Interdisciplinary Knowledge of Art and Science in the XXI Century, hosted at the Center for Research in Biodiversity and Sustainable Environments (CIBAS) at Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción. The year-long program hosted a cohort of artists and scientists focused on addressing current environmental challenges in Central/Southern Chile and the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The five pillars of the program were to Advance Research and Practice of Art + Science, Ignite Awareness of Biocultural Diversity, Introduce Emerging Technologies, Inspire Environmental Stewardship, and Promote Transdisciplinary Collaboration (Figure 2). The generative work of the cohort culminated in a capstone event: an international art exhibition focused on the pressing environmental issues of sustainability, biodiversity loss, and climate change. Final works in virtual reality, augmented reality, textile, video, animation, and sculpture were showcased in the exhibition, “Reticula: Ecology and Art Reimagined for the XXI Century,” and in Chile’s first art and science biennial, Bienal Concepción Arte & Ciencia, 2019. 
Figure 2. ASKXXI Program Pillars: Advance Research and Practice of Art + Science, Ignite Awareness of Biocultural Diversity, Introduce Emerging Technologies, Inspire Environmental Stewardship, Promote Transdisciplinary Collaboration.
Six-circle Venn diagram of the ASKXXI program pillars.

Artists, designers, scientists, and communicators across disciplines play a key role in impacting critical environmental challenges and engaging in speculative approaches. Many interdisciplinary residency programs offering residencies and collaborative opportunities in this area inspired our model. (sidenote: Artsci Publishing is a useful resource for these collaborative investigations. http://artsci.org/. Simetría is an exchange residency between CERN and the Chilean Observatories (ALMA and VLT), giving artists the opportunity to explore new advances in astronomy and particle physics. https://arts.cern/article/simetria. The Schmidt Ocean Artist at Sea program, in which Dunlop, one of the authors, participated, provides an oceanic platform for technology-based research collaborations between artists and leading marine scientists. https://schmidtocean.org/apply/artist-residency-program/ ) Ten Chilean professionals were selected as fellows for an integrated arts and science professional development program focused on recent advances in terrestrial/marine ecology, connecting relevant lines of research in both regions. From the onset, we envisioned this cohort as a collaborative team, and framed the spirit of our transdisciplinary, relational, and process-driven collaborations across disciplines as an “ecology of practices.” A diverse consortium of academic and industry partnerships rooted in two territories served as a platform to support territorial investigations and provide exposure to new narrative creation and technology innovations. Working in collaboration with our partner consortium, we co-created and delivered 40+ workshops across a range of topics focused on art, ecology, and emerging technologies over a year-long timeline (Figure 3). 

Figure 3. ASKXXI Program Timeline
Table showing the four phases of the program
We visited research facilities (field sites, biological stations, laboratories) while engaging in hands-on research of pressing environmental issues such as invasive species, sustainable fisheries, wildfires and land use, and climate change. (sidenote: For more information about the various workshops, sites, and studio visits, see the ASKXXI program catalog www.askxxi.com ) Studio visits with artists, designers, and curators introduced contemporary arts practices. Remote e-learning experiences kept us connected with the different institutions, researchers, and mentors. With the culminating exhibition in mind, studio and visualization projects—based on each fellow’s interest, background, and network of collaborators—developed throughout the program. An early concept map of our knowledge network was helpful in visualizing the ambitious scale of the program (Figure 4). The relationships the fellows maintained within different personal networks and institutions added to our ecology of practices. Concept mapping exercises of evolving collaboration networks were woven throughout the program to allow for a critical evaluation of established (professional/institutional) art/science relationships before and after US and Chilean trips. These creative ways of visualizing transdisciplinary networks provided qualitative and quantitative metrics of individual interactions and captured potential future evolving collaboration networks.
Figure 4. ASKXXI Knowledge Network 2017.
A colorful Illustration of an interdisciplinary network linking art and science curatorial, research, industry, academic, community, and funding partners.
Illustration created by Martin Krzywinski (Michael Smith Genome Sciences Center) and Genevieve Tremblay. (2017)

Evolution of the Program

The point of activation for ASKXXI was in 2016 when two of the founding members, Fernanda Oyarzún and Genevieve Tremblay, were virtually introduced through colleagues at the Whiteley Center Art and Science residency program at the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Marine Research Lab. (sidenote: Oyarzún, Fernanda. 2018. “ASKXXI: Arts and Science Knowledge Building and Sharing in the XXI Century.” FHL TIde Bites Newsletter. University of Washington, Friday Harbor Marine Labs. http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/tidebites/Vol55/index.html ) Oyarzún (marine scientist/artist), was leading Proyecto Robsonella, a scientific illustration course in coastal Chile, while Tremblay (artist, technologist, educator) was teaching, developing transdisciplinary curricula, and spearheading art and science partnerships at Cornish College of the Arts. Their mutual interest in interdisciplinary approaches of art and scientific research in natural marine environments aligned their efforts and inspired the model for the pilot that would become a certificate program. Weekly Chile - US video conferencing calls provided the opportunity to collaboratively explore the possibilities of an international collaboration, as the founding team expanded to include Chilean terrestrial ecologists and science communicators Belén Gallardo and Nélida Pohl. The team explored institutional relationships for funding, assembling Chilean and US partners and creating a flexible, adaptable, and practice-based professional development program model. The meticulous process of building an infrastructure took the better part of a year to secure, with Tremblay and Oyarzún traveling between Chile and the US for in-person planning and relationship building. From there, the development of a range of courses, site visits, immersive experiences and personal connections to inspirational people and practices was mapped out, later taking shape as a formalized professional development curriculum for the selected fellows.

The core ethos of ASKXXI’s ecology of practices was the lateral nature of its relationships. In the absence of epistemological hierarchies, diverse arts and research practices were approached equally as ways of creating knowledge. All fellows shared their own field’s methods of research through workshops, switching back and forth between the roles of learner and teacher. Some of the planned activities involved designing research projects in real natural settings. These projects included both ecological and artistic investigations, encouraging fellows to develop their own nuanced approach to ecology by integrating their personal area of (arts or scientific) research into other ways of working within the group. The program included almost no traditional classroom settings which perpetuate disciplinary boundaries; instead, it let place mediate the learning process. (sidenote: Johnson, Jay T. 2012. “Place-Based Learning and Knowing: Critical Pedagogies Grounded in Indigeneity.” GeoJournal 77.6 (2012): 829–836. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10708-010-9379-1 )

Regional expeditions in the US and Chile included field-based marine and terrestrial investigations (Figures 5-7). Although the program was focused on global thinking, much research occurred locally, so we placed equal emphasis on value-rooted knowledge, community work, and territorial perspectives. It was visiting the places where people study and create, and performing those research practices in situ, that allowed questions to emerge—questions that could be later explored using scientific and artistic approaches to creating, understanding, and communicating knowledge. This experiential and lateral approach was possible because of the blurring of disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Removing the comfort found in predictable learning structures necessitated that participants constantly adapt to change. Although this approach created freedom to explore, it also contributed to burnout for the organizing team because of the lack of solid institutional support, resources, and budget.
Figure 5. ASKXXI Environmental art workshop, Chiloe Island, Chile. During the Chile expedition, the group visited Senda Darwin Biological Field Station, where fellows led field-based terrestrial investigations and environmental art workshops. (Left) The cohort engaged in discussions focused on the architecture of the forest, its materiality and composition. (Center) Fellows Nicol García and Marianela Camaño sample for lichen material to observe under a microscope. (Right) Marcelo Velasco, Thomas Kramer, and Beatriz Buttazzoni discuss environmental art installations created by fellows.
Three images. Left: eleven individuals seated outdoors on the grass for group discussion. Center: two individuals taking samples from a tree trunk. Right: three individuals discussing an earth-based artwork.
Figure 6. Marine based field work at Melimoyu Marine Nature Reserve, Northern Patagonia, Aysen Region of Chile. Fellows Beatriz Buttazzoni, Thomas Kramer, Nélida Pohl, and Pablo Savaria learn the techniques of electric fishing.
Four individuals in rain gear wade in water with electric fishing equipment.
Figure 7. (Top) Fernanda Oyarzún, Belén Gallardo and Cecilia Toro rowing in the waters around San Juan Island, WA. (Bottom) Members of ASKXXI convene on the docks for Nightlighting activities.
Two images. Top: three people in a rowboat. Bottom: eight people lined up at a dock.
Aerial view of nightlighting activity on the docks at Friday Harbor Marine Labs, San Juan Island, WA, which involves inserting illumination equipment into the water to observe bioluminescent activity.

Our ecology of practices approach was centered on asking questions (hence, ASKXXI), and reoriented learning and research through the collective sharing of knowledge and skills by the program participants. In each local exploratory project, the fellows acted as cartographers, mapping the new areas of research that pushed beyond their professional expertise.

Integration: Building the Interhemispheric Scaffold

The ASKXXI leadership team reached beyond the realm of higher education to build an ecosystem of partnerships across sectors and domains. This interhemispheric network provided the foundation of a flexible platform, bridging networks from Patagonia to the Pacific Rim. (sidenote: Johnson, Jay T. 2012. “Place-Based Learning and Knowing: Critical Pedagogies Grounded in Indigeneity.” GeoJournal 77.6 (2012): 829–836. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10708-010-9379-1 )

Steps to bridging:

  • Institutional consortium building (academic, industry, cultural, community)
  • Funding development
  • Competitive call process
  • Fellow application review and selection
  • Chile-US faculty and advisory network development
  • Curriculum development and approval
  • Remote learning platform and virtual workflow development


The lateral and collaborative learning structure of the team allowed for rich and adaptive inquiries that evolved over the program duration. (sidenote: Brice, Jeff, and Genevieve Tremblay. 2021. “Art + Science Knowledge Building: ASKXXI Pilot: Personalized Learning Through an Ecology of Practices.” In Career Ready Education Through Experiential Learning, edited by Pamela Northrup, Karen Rasmussen, and Robin Colson, 106-135. IGI Global https://www.igi-global.com/book/career-ready-education-through-experiential/234641 )

Our main institutional partners were the Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad (IEB) and the US Embassy, Santiago (Public Affairs), who sponsored the program through a public diplomacy grant. Our subsequent diploma program, The Construction of Interdisciplinary Knowledge of Art and Science in the XXI Century, was hosted at the Center for Research in Biodiversity and Sustainable Environments (CIBAS) at Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción. The participating Chilean and US institutions are represented in our institutional partner map and program leadership diagram (Figure 8).
Figure 8. ASKXXI US Chile Academic and Research Consortium Map identifying our partners in Chile and the Pacific Northwest of the US.
Map of North/South America with corresponding program sites in the US and Chile identified with red dots.

Site- and Field-based Workshops

An international team of advisors across the spectrum of arts, ecology, embryology, biomechanics, technology research, science communication hosted studio visits, workshops, and tours.

Scientific workshops were focused on marine, terrestrial, and wetlands ecology restoration, preservation, and conservation. The technology-based workshops introduced a range of innovative visualization and lab technologies that included data visualization, spatial computing, parametric modeling, microscopy, gene splicing, virtual/mixed reality, 3D photogrammetry and illustration (Figures 9-13). Art studio visits and lectures were hosted by artists working across a range of media that included bookmaking, ceramic sculpture, 3D printing, virtual painting, augmented reality, E-textiles, wearable technology, digital media and artificial intelligence (AI) (Figures 14-15).

Figure 9. (Top) Jevin West, Associate Professor and Director of the Center for an Informed Public at the University of Washington, shares the work of his data visualization students at UW Data Lab. (Bottom) Data Visualization and Data Journalism workshops with Christian Schmidt of Schema Design.
Two images. Top: a group of people in a room with desks and chairs look at a poster entitled “Visualizing Scholarly Influence Over Time.” Bottom: Eight individuals sit at a table with a laptop opened (left) and man in a classroom stands and speaks in front of a projection (right).
Figure 10. (Left) 3D and 4D Data Visualization and Mixed Reality workshop with Curtis Wong, Steve Druker, Dave Brown of Microsoft Research, demonstrating capabilities of mixed reality and Hololens.
Group sitting around a large table with an illuminated, augmented reality image of buildings hovering above table.
(Right) Video of Dave Brown of Microsoft demonstrating geospatial and temporal storm data, flight patterns, volcanoes, and earthquakes.
Figure 11. (Left) US Lab workshops: ASKXXI Fellow Javiera Constanzo learning gene splicing techniques from Siddarth Ramakrishnan, PhD, neuroscientist and Professor of Biology at University of Puget Sound. (Right) Adam Summers, Biology Professor at University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Marine Labs, introducing electron microscope techniques to ASKXXI fellow José de la Parra.
Two images. Left: a male instructor shows a slide to a seated woman. Right: two seated men view a desktop screen of an electron microscope image.
Figure 12. (Left) The workshop ‘Visualizing Data Dimensionally,’ led by Jeff Brice, offered a range of technologies such as parametric modeling, lidar scanning and mixed reality using Hololens. (Right) Microscopy and Art & Science Practice, led by Geraldine Ondrizek, at Friday Harbor Marine Labs, University of Washington.
Four images in a grid. Top left: an instructor surrounded by six students demonstrates 3D scanning with an iPhone. Top right: a man in a classroom points to a poster. Bottom right: image of 3D-modeled diatom. Bottom left: a man holds up a Hololens headset.  Image at right: a woman looks into and adjusts a light microscope.
ASKXXI guest Sil Lazzarino explores VR painting during Nathan DiPietro’s VR workshop.
Figure 13. Virtual Painting workshops with Nathan DiPietro: Fredy Diaz photographs Nathan working in VR and Marianela Camano explores VR painting using Google Tiltbrush at Pacific Science Center.
A man in the foreground holds up an iPad, photographing a VR artist. A woman wears a VR headset and holds devices.
Figure 14. Art studio visit and lecture with artist Timea Tihanyi at her 3D ceramic printing studio, Slip Rabbit Studio (Seattle, WA).
Left: a woman lectures to a group of visitors standing around a table in a 3D printing ceramic studio. Right: a woman holds up a small artifact.
Figure 15. (Left) Studio visit to the studio of visual artist, Ian Boyden, on San Juan Island, which included a viewing of his artist book collection. (Right) Visit to artist Ginny Ruffner’s studio to see “Reforestation of the Imagination,” a new work integrating glass sculpture and augmented reality (Seattle, WA).
Left: a man flips through a  large artist book on a table, surrounded by viewers. Right: a woman holds an iPad in the foreground while two women talk in the background. They are in a room with exposed brick walls and potted plants.

Innovation

The most vibrant elements of the program were the people involved and the possibilities created. Our consortium model leveraged the synergies of the founding team’s affiliations and brought together international contributors from research, academia, industry, and cultural diplomacy. Strategic relationship-building began a year prior to the start of the program and was essential in forging these alliances. ASKXXI developed as an iterative process, dependent on the feedback loops of the participants and contributing to an evolving ecology of practices and participants. Because the program was developed outside the boundaries of any one academic institution, it benefitted from the freedoms inherent in such an experimental and collaborative model that allow it to adapt to dynamic and shifting social needs.

Our experimental pilot employed an entrepreneurial dynamic and served as an “educational simulation,” providing data about the feasibility of interhemispheric knowledge exchange, interdisciplinary collaboration, collegiality, and cooperation between institutions. ASKXXI expanded the professional capacities of both fellows and faculty. One of the most valuable outcomes of ASKXXI is the thriving networked ecosystem, connecting people from different backgrounds together and building more inclusive communities of practice. The immersive, field-based experiences curated for the cohort offered points of entry to new knowledge, fresh cultural perspectives, and emerging professional realms. Beyond the diploma curriculum (sidenote: Diplomado: “Construcción de Conocimiento, Interdisciplinario Arte-Ciencia en el Siglo XXI (ASKXXI)” Diploma:“ASK XXI: Arts+Science Knowledge- Building and Sharing in the XXI Century”, Facultad de Ciencias & Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Diciembre, 2017 https://www.ucsc.cl/noticias/ciencia-arte-y-tecnologia-convergen-en-nuevo-diplomado-de-la-ucsc/ ) and program deliverables, ASKXXI acted as a stepping-stone for a series of collaborative efforts that have extended its impact over time (for an in-depth list of these collaborations, see supplemental materials below).

While the program’s distributed, unbounded nature was one of its greatest strengths, it was also its Achilles heel. The program required virtual collaboration methods and a range of complex, cloud-based, remote collaboration and visualization tools. In addition to being ambitious, multi-sited, and interdisciplinary, it was also bilingual. The fellows had a range of language abilities, so more translation work was required from the team to communicate effectively. The lack of administrative support, contingency funding, and resources associated with a single, reliable academic platform taxed our team. It also impacted our overall capacity, and ultimately, our ability to sustain an ongoing program. However, the groundwork was laid to anchor an interhemispheric and integrative research network. Figure 16, an example of a recurring network mapping assignment, illustrates sample nodes in this network.
Figure 16. Visualization of the evolving collaboration network, “The Collaboration System,” by ASKXXI fellow, Nicol García. This is an example of the relational mapping that the fellows conducted throughout their year-long experience.
Circles representing people in the ASKXXI network are connected to each other in a larger circular system.

Conclusion

Artists and scientists both engage in speculative approaches. Together, they play a key role in impacting critical environmental challenges. ASKXXI posed many questions and explored the emergent properties that flourish when the boundaries of art and science vanish. Social exchanges, both curated and serendipitous, created openings for dialogue and reflections related to culture, politics, access, and uses of technology within contemporary practices. The comparative analysis of these bioregions offered scientific and cultural perspectives that stretched what we considered to be our “areas of concern.” With a global view, we sought hyper-local, rooted knowledge and territorial perspectives, setting up the conditions for making experiential connections in the lab, in the field, and in the studio. Every contributor to our program (our fellows, faculty, academic, industry, and community partners, and funders) are now nodes of a much larger, dynamic network: an innovative ecosystem of practitioners that now include a2ru, Transgeneratives 2030, SECOS, Bienal Concepción: Arte y Ciencia, Fundacion Renihue, Festival Reino Fungi, Valley of the Possible, Schmidt Ocean, Friday Harbor Marine Labs, and others who are building novel approaches to knowledge production, co-creation, and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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Supplemental Material

Beyond the pilot program deliverables, ASKXXI acted as a stepping-stone for efforts that have extended its impact that include:


Footnotes

  1. Artsci Publishing is a useful resource for these collaborative investigations. http://artsci.org/. Simetría is an exchange residency between CERN and the Chilean Observatories (ALMA and VLT), giving artists the opportunity to explore new advances in astronomy and particle physics. https://arts.cern/article/simetria. The Schmidt Ocean Artist at Sea program, in which Dunlop, one of the authors, participated, provides an oceanic platform for technology-based research collaborations between artists and leading marine scientists. https://schmidtocean.org/apply/artist-residency-program/
  2. For more information about the various workshops, sites, and studio visits, see the ASKXXI program catalog www.askxxi.com
  3. Oyarzún, Fernanda. 2018. “ASKXXI: Arts and Science Knowledge Building and Sharing in the XXI Century.” FHL TIde Bites Newsletter. University of Washington, Friday Harbor Marine Labs. http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/tidebites/Vol55/index.html
  4. Johnson, Jay T. 2012. “Place-Based Learning and Knowing: Critical Pedagogies Grounded in Indigeneity.” GeoJournal 77.6 (2012): 829–836. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10708-010-9379-1
  5. Brice, Jeff, and Genevieve Tremblay. 2021. “Art + Science Knowledge Building: ASKXXI Pilot: Personalized Learning Through an Ecology of Practices.” In Career Ready Education Through Experiential Learning, edited by Pamela Northrup, Karen Rasmussen, and Robin Colson, 106-135. IGI Global https://www.igi-global.com/book/career-ready-education-through-experiential/234641
  6. Diplomado: “Construcción de Conocimiento, Interdisciplinario Arte-Ciencia en el Siglo XXI (ASKXXI)” Diploma:“ASK XXI: Arts+Science Knowledge- Building and Sharing in the XXI Century”, Facultad de Ciencias & Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Diciembre, 2017 https://www.ucsc.cl/noticias/ciencia-arte-y-tecnologia-convergen-en-nuevo-diplomado-de-la-ucsc/
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Acknowledgements

The research for this project was supported by Coastal Social-Ecological Millennium Institute SECOS. The ASKXXI program was supported by a public diplomacy grant from the US Embassy Santiago (Public Affairs - SCI800-17-GR-0051) grant as well as in-kind donations from faculty team, advisors, and program partners. Exhibition Retícula was sponsored by Cultura UCSC and Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción and co-hosted by the 01 Bienal Concepción. Many thanks to our inaugural cohort of fellows: Jose de la Parra, Marcelo Velasco, Cecelia Toro, Thomas Kramer, Pablo Savaria, Fernando Mejías, Miguel Bolt, Marianela Camaño, Javiera Constanzo, Beatriz Buttazzoni, Nicole García. Thanks to our institutional partners, faculty advisors, artists and presenters (Fig 13): Antonio Brante, Fredy Diaz, Juan Armesto, Enrique Silva, Claudia Papic, Daniel Varela, Konrad Gorski, Silvia Lazzarino, Felipe Portilla, Olga Barbosa, Juan Carolos Orellana, Marcela Alcaino, Sara Olivia Fuetes, Claudia Iln, Adam Summers, Drew Harvell, Geraldine Ondrizek, Jack deLap, Billie Swalla, Megan Cook, Ian Boyden, Rebecca Cummins, Siddharth Ramakrishnan, Martha Groom, Becca Price, Jason Pace, Amy Lambert, Sara Verlinde Azofeifa, Curtis Wong, Steve Druker, Dave Brown, Forest Key, Christian Schmidt, Jevin West, Diane Quinn, Becky Haruyama, Sandy Cioffi, John Boylan, Timea Tihanyi, George Rodriguez, Nathan DiPietro, Ginny Ruffner, Stacy Gilbert, Emily Zimmerman, Amir Sheikh, Hilary Hayford, Peter H. Winberger, Peter Hodum, Bryan Thimes, Sara Alderstein, Steve Neshyba, John Savo, Afroditi Psarra, Maja Petric. Additional thanks to our program supporters Mary Hayes, John Boylan, Fisher Qua, Laura Zeck, Ellen Ziegler, Rachel Lodge, Martha Worthley, Casey Curran.